17.7.10

This made me want coffee!!! Al Pacino endorses VIttoria Coffee

Gutsy TV spot| marketing for woman!

Check out these two videos for Quattro for Women, with the bikini area trimmer. The first one is pretty much how you'd think they would introduce the new product. I

t's about 90 seconds long so I am guessing they trimmed it down for a TV spot are using the longer form on their website. The second....well, it's not what I would have expected.




One is incredibly safe...the other, not so much. But, which one do you think will actually sell more razors?



'Mow the Lawn' 
Created by JWT New York to build awareness and drive trial for the new Wilkinson Sword Quattro for Women Bikini







Gillette Survey: How Do You Like It Shaved?







Axe girls cleaning the balls







Extreme. Entertaining. Roguishly symbolic, and its Axe.

World Cup Advertising.




There's only one event that displays more advertising clout than the Super Bowl and that's the World Cup. And the cool thing about the world cup is that—well, it includes the world—so we get an international peek into the industry and culture surrounding the sport of futbol, football, soccer or whatever you call it. Graphicology will be looking out for the best, worst, and most interesting work this year and posting them below. 


1. Adidas |Star Wars Cantina.
Snoop Dog. Daft Punk. Noel Gallagher. David Beckham. Actor Jay Baruchel. Agency, Sid Lee, of Amsterdam pulled out all the punches for this spot in a remake of the famous Star Wars Episode IV cantina scene. It's hard not to watch all two minutes of it and is one of the few longer format ads that still feels too short. A really fun idea. The only small issue I have with it is the emphasis on originality with the Adidas tagline, given the somewhat unoriginal remake. But I'm being picky here. It's enjoyable and just what we'd want from a Super Bowl spot: celebrity, pop-culture references, humor and a tie-in into the event ala Mr. Bend-it.


2. Nike | Write The Future.
This piece has already got a ton of press. And it seems like everybody loves this spot. One thing I'll say is this: It's a ride of a spot. It takes you with it, which is a huge compliment to the Wieden and Kennedy folks. I was talking to a friend about this short film and what struck them (and I think this is a very astute comment) is that it's obvious in a day when ad and ad production budgets are being slashed, who has the money to spend. This was one expensive spot to pull off and that really sticks out just as much as the concept does. Maybe more so. (And let's be clear, the concept is solid but not ground-breaking. It is helped a lot by the tagline and positioning too.) All that being said, it's another fun one to sit back and watch. I do wonder how they'll make the shorter format ads work, as I think the sum is greater than the parts.



3. Pepsi | Oh Africa.
I guess that whole we're-not-really-advertising-anymore approach is already gone out the window. Pepsi pulls a few football stars together in ridiculously stupid-looking Pepsi shirts and challenge a few african kids to a game, where the pitch is formed by all the locals who of course try to make it more difficult on the star players. Honestly, there are a few nice moments but this spot feels like it was produced in a third world country. It's production value and art direction falls flat, which is a shame b/c the concept of the pitch being made up of people was rather well thought out. It tries to be epic, featuring the 
Oh Africa song by Akon and just comes up a bit short.


4. Mars Bar | For England.
Those rascals at Mars are rooting for England? I'm pretty sure Mars is an American company, right? It sure is tough for multi-nationals to appeal to a local market in the digital age when people all around the world can see the ad on YouTube. I'm sure the loyal US soccer contingent will boycott Mars brand candy bars throughout the World Cup as a result of this post. What? There is no loyal US soccer contingent? Oh, you're right. Nevermind. Anyway, this spot is pretty bad and features England footballer John Barnes rapping a stupid song which apparently is a resurrection of his rap that was once popular back in 1990. And you guessed it, everybody joins in singing. I get the sense that there will be a lot of instances where the whole world comes together in advertising to sing something in harmony. Too bad it only happens in commercials and because that's true this also feels like a European ad that is somehow below industry standards.



5. Visa| Run to the Game
Here's a little concept that I like. It's simple. Interesting to pull off. And like the Nike and Adidas spot is fun to watch. It features an overweight guy who gets excited by a goal and decides to run to South Africa where the World Cup is being played. He grabs his Visa card and uses it all along the journey and in doing so, he becomes extremely fit, athletic and in shape enough to run out onto the field and score a goal himself. It's a rather ingenious way to work in the client's benefit while being cinematic enough for such an event. Agency Saatchi & Saatchi, London is responsible for this effort. Well-done guys and gals.



6. Powerade | Inner Thoughts
Powerade is doing something rather interesting. Instead of releasing one or two spots for the games, they are releasing 16 inner thoughts that you have to find within the timeline of a never-ending game. It's not difficult to 'find' them and I wish the search played a bigger part of the concept. Each inner thought is a take on a player's mindset as well as the product benefits during athletic events. Each has a different storytelling style and are worth checking out. You can't embed the video here, so just click on the still below to take you to their YouTube channel.



7. Coca-Cola | History of Celebration
Perhaps the spot that connects with the actual game the most so far, Coke's History of Celebration does just that, takes the viewer through goal-scoring dances throughout the last few decades. It lacks an importance that some of the other spots have, but the spot features some pretty funny choreography that would make the touch=down performances in the NFL seem like elementary school theater. (Ol' Ocho Cinco would do well in FIFA.) I think the voice-over is redone depending on where the spot is airing and it's fun to compare the different reads. Below is the British version, I believe, followed by a better quality German VO.






8-GOOGLE Promo Spot for 2010 World Cup | Search story - get ready for south africa
Great promo spot by Google, another of The Google Search Story videos, this time for the FIFA 2010 World Cup - Get Ready For South Africa.



Credits:
Client: Google
Agency: Google Creative Lab (In-House)
Tagline: Search On.
Prod Company: 1st Ave Machine
Director: Aaron Duffy
EP(s): Serge Patzak, Sam Penfield
Producer(s): John Burger, Crystal Campbell
Head of Creative Development: Claire Mitchell
Concept Art: Carlos Ancalmo
AE Artists: Joon Park, John Stanch, John Loughlin, Will Decker, Anthony Serriano, WeiTo Chow
EP: Alan Zahn
Composer: Jeremy Turner
Sound Design: Analogue Muse
Sound Designer(s): Geoff Strasser, Nick Cipriano
Producers: Alan Zahn, Jeremy Turner
Audio Post: Muse Mix
Mixer: Nick Cipriano



9- Hyundai |Giant vuvuzela


Vuvuzela
For a little plastic horn, the vuvuzela sure stirs up a lot of passion. Some have called for banning it from the World Cup because, in great numbers, it creates deafening noise in packed stadiums. Right or wrong, it's become synonymous with soccer in South Africa. Pereira O'Dell wants to help fans toot their own vuvuzelas with a new iPhone app. The Pocket Vuvuzela lets you blare four different virtual vuvuzela sounds in support of your team by shaking the app or tapping an on-screen soccer ball. If you're looking for something a little bigger and less virtual, you'll have to travel to Cape Town, where Hyundai has built a 114-foot-long vuvuzela and mounted it on top of a building. Check out the test blow below.





10- Nationwide| 'Little Britain' - Capello
Campaign: Nationwide highlights its sponsorship of England's World Cup team by recruiting some colorful characters from the hit TV series Little Britain to put a little laugh next to the brand. Funny.


11-IRN-BRU|A Bruzil Lullaby














Campaign: Brazen Scottish beverage brand brews a funny World Cup campaign dubbed "Bruzil." The lullaby theme (above) is complimented by a more energetic "Ya Beauty"pregnancy test version. The concept: Scotland hasn't been a World Cup contender in years, so let's get Brazil to breed the next team Scotland! Inexplicably compelling.
12-SureMen|Rube Goldberg machine







Campaign: Wow. SureMen goes a totally different direction by constructing a complexRube Goldberg machine replete with World Cup thematic elements. 


13- Carlsberg |Team Talk
 
Campaign: The lager brand goes for the heart with its 2010 "Team Talk" campaign, a stirring call to all England fans. Sprinkled with historical elements and paced to a rising finish.


14-Kit Kat| 'Cross Your Fingers'





Campaign: The Nestlé-owned chocolate finger brand is facing censure in the UK following a cry of "foul!" by rival Mars, an FA sponsor this World Cup season, for this campaign. Kit Kat goes the sincere route, asking England fans to "cross your fingers." 


15-Louis Vuitton |Zidane Pele Maradona





Campaign: Soccer (sorry: football) legends Zidane, Maradona and Pelé, as captured by American photog Annie Leibovitz for the 2010 World Cup trophy-case maker. What else is there to say? Pelé! It's a header summit!


16- MTV|SPOOKY



17-Nandos| "Take your tops off… for our visitors."



18-Wimpy|National breakfast





19- Argentine Sports Channel TyC|Argentinos




Cultural differences of each country, especially in football.
It is known that Brazilians love to hate the Argentines and Argentine hate to love the Brazilians.More than that, however, the Argentines have a vision of themselves that does not match the one the world have them.


Agency: Young & Rubicam, Buenos Aires, Argentina
Executive Creative Director: Martín Mercado
Creative Directors: Diego Tuya & Darío Rial
Photographer: Rolo Pulpeiro
Music: Kronos Quartet
Aired: March 2010



20-Budweiser | "Kick"



In 2006 Budweiser experienced the unfortunate insult of being boycotted by the host country's fans. So what has the brand done for 2010? Girls! Frat boy humor! Oh Bud, please never change. By July you will come to loathe this ad


21- MCDONALD'S|World's Cup





22-Castrol Magnatec|2010 FIFA World Cup



23-Sony BRAVIA|Superstar





Imagine reliving the greatest games - Sony provides several different entries, including a humorous retail-specific ad and a broader "Feel What They Feel" brand messaging bit. But both pale in comparison to the unexpectedly moving spot featuring children (above). While the Sony brand isn't explicitly tied into the theme, the ad perfectly captures the true fun of the sport and takes you back to when you dreamed you might someday yourself play in the Cup. Of FIFA


24- Hyundai|World Cup Pre- launching





25-Bebe |World Cup



26-Danoninho - Copa do Mundo




27- Guardian and Observer's World Cup 2010 




They are running a television and print advertising campaign to promote their World Cup guides, wall-charts, match day programmes,
The campaign pivots the striker who scored a goal with his bum (haha), and Guardian campaign centers around the hype created by that goal.
Guardian is also showing its strong web presence 
through its updates
Credits
Advertising agency: Wieden+Kennedy
Creative team: Ben Terrett, Rob Burleigh and David Stevens
Agency producer: Gill Oglethrope.
Animation: Peppermelon, Buenos Aires
Director/editor: Tomas Garcia

28- Adidas: Jabulani Outdoor









Advertising Agency: Lew’Lara/TBWA, San Paulo, Brazil
Executive Creative Director: Jaques Lewcowicz, André Laurentino, Felipe Luchi, Manir Fadel
Copywriter / Art Director: Marcos Almirante, Marcelo Rizério
Account manager: Márcio Oliveira, Ricardo Forli, Guilherme Bernardes, Felipe Oliveira, Thibis Rebellato, Camilla Gouvea

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